WiWo App 1 Monat für nur 0,99 €
Anzeigen

Starkoch im Interview Jamie Oliver: Just fuckin' eat it!

Seite 2/4

What's so regional about scallops with fried ginger, seeds of pomegranate, shiso-cress and a sour japanese yuzu-juice?

The primary ingredients will all be german and of quality and absolutely from the region we're gonna doing the show. First and foremost: Germans won't come to a show to watch an english boy cook german traditional cooking. Germans will come to this, for this kind of stuff in my menu. And to be honest: This starter-dish is like a one-off in ten years. This is something I made up that happened to stick and I tried to throw it away and it wouldn't go away, so I kept putting it back on the menu.

But the plate is so full of unknown ingredients based on a mussel, the people might need a manual. Some dishes these days are explained by a waiter.

The scallop-crudo is even in my world an unusual dish. That's the reason I put it up for the first menu. It will be off in two months time. But you don't need a manual at all. If you can manage to get a bit of everything in your gob at the same time it's like quite an experience. And if you don't: It's okay. Normally I say: Just fuckin' eat it.

Well, it is delicious...

But I think my job in these show is to represent me, honestly, but also a few surprises. We are writing seasonal menus. So you'll see them change. So if there's wild mushrooms, they'll be wild german mushrooms. If there's beef it will be from a good supplier of german beef. I think it's not my job to bring scottish beef into Germany. But if you're using things like prosciutto or mozzarella you don't buy it in Germany or England but in Italy.

Your show in Germany is running in two cities at the same time. Don't you disappoint guests when you are not around at all? Because what makes you special is you.

Right.

Not the food.

Yeah, but I don't think you could sell 20 million books based on people likin' you. I could base one year of booksales on people likin' me but not for ten years in a row. That's based on trust, the recipes working. People using those recipes in their lives. On special occasions. I am a great believer that it is just more than the face and the brand. I run four restaurants which are all charity, right? „fifteen“ in London, Cornwall, Amsterdam and Melbourne. They are all profitable. And London is seven years old this year. In the next three years I like to open restaurants in South Africa and Germany. When I started „fifteen“ I was in the kitchen for a year and a half. I suppose what I am saying is: The most important thing is not about what I do, but what I get other people to do. In the four „fifteen“ restaurants I approve the menus. It's my job to inspire the chefs to make the best of their local produce and have the confidence to use that. Also service, what it looks like, what music's being played.

That goes for the show in Hamburg and Frankfurt as well?

In no communication we say that I will be there. I'll be at the launches of the shows. It's more of a cultural thing. Of what food is, how it's served, where it's come from.

Was it important to you that your German partner had experience with that kind of shows?

Yes, absolutely. It was important for me that my partner, Michael Hoffmann, has done it successfully for many, many years.

Have you seen one of his earlier shows?

I have never, ever seen one of those shows. But to be honest: It has nothing to do with what we do either. Personally I am not interested in what anyone has done before whether it's TV, publishing or this here. You know, this is the excuse to try something new and push the boundaries a bit.

There's always the risk that you lose your reputation if people see the show and the food isn't what they expected. Like Eckart Witzigmann, the former Three-Star-Chef was risking to lose his good reputation when he did that kind of show.

We are certainly not selling Three-Star-Food.

At least not to 400 people at one time.

No, it's fucking hard. It's really hard. It's really important to control people's expectations.

When you open your restaurant in Germany, what can people expect?

I'd like „fifteen“ to open in Berlin in the next three years. „fifteen“ is not a straight restaurant. The children that we train – 80 percent are from prison, five percent homeless and the rest reasonably lost, young people. The back end of that: That eats up all our profit. We make good blood..., errr, ... we take a lot of money, we make good profits in London and it all get's eaten up by counselling staff, takin' them on trips. It's fucking expensive. That's why I can go into a courtroom and get a kid out of jail. It's because basically 75 percent of our kids end up paying tax, having good jobs, staying out of trouble, keeping off drugs. And, you know, each student cost me about 30 000 pounds a year. How many restaurants do you know that start every financial year with 300 grand debt? That's what I've done for seven years and it's fucking scary. And you've got to be busy, busy, busy all the time. That's how that works. I don't think I can rush that. I have to work with local government, local colleges and find good local people.

Inhalt
Artikel auf einer Seite lesen
© Handelsblatt GmbH – Alle Rechte vorbehalten. Nutzungsrechte erwerben?
Zur Startseite
-0%1%2%3%4%5%6%7%8%9%10%11%12%13%14%15%16%17%18%19%20%21%22%23%24%25%26%27%28%29%30%31%32%33%34%35%36%37%38%39%40%41%42%43%44%45%46%47%48%49%50%51%52%53%54%55%56%57%58%59%60%61%62%63%64%65%66%67%68%69%70%71%72%73%74%75%76%77%78%79%80%81%82%83%84%85%86%87%88%89%90%91%92%93%94%95%96%97%98%99%100%